(Sub)Urban boyscout.Tech-whisperer. Tech-skeptic.
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It Takes A Lot To Build A Hacker’s Laptop

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An essential tool that nearly all of us will have is our laptop. For hardware and software people alike it’s our workplace, entertainment device, window on the world, and so much more. The relationship between hacker and laptop is one that lasts through thick and thin, so choosing a new one is an important task. Will it be a dependable second-hand ThinkPad, the latest object of desire from Apple, or whatever cast-off could be scrounged and given a GNU/Linux distro? On paper all laptops deliver substantially the same mix of performance and portability, but in reality there are so many variables that separate a star from a complete dog. Into this mix comes a newcomer that we’ve had an eye on for a while, the Framework. It’s a laptop that looks just like so many others on the market and comes with all the specs at a price you’d expect from any decent laptop, but it has a few tricks up its sleeve that make it worth a glance.

These USB-C based modules are a neat idea.
These USB-C based modules are a neat idea.

Probably the most obvious among them is that as well as the off-the-shelf models, it can be bought as a customised kit for self-assembly. Bring your own networking, memory, or storage, and configure your new laptop in a much more personal way than the norm from the big manufacturers. We like that all the parts are QR coded with a URL that delivers full information on them, but we’re surprised that for a laptop with this as its USP there’s no preinstalled open source OS as an option. Few readers will find installing a GNU/Linux distro a problem, but it’s an obvious hole in the line-up.

On the rear is the laptop’s other party trick, a system of expansion cards that are dockable modules with a USB-C interface. So far they provide USB, display, and storage interfaces with more to come including an Arduino module, and we like this idea a lot.

It’s all very well to exclaim at a few features and party tricks, but the qualities that define a hacker’s laptop are only earned through use. Does it have a keyboard that will last forever, can it survive being dropped, and will its electronics prove to be fragile, are all questions that can be answered only by word-of-mouth from users. It’s easy for a manufacturer to get those wrong — the temperamental and fragile Dell this is being typed on is a case in point — but if they survive the trials presented by their early adopters and match up to the competition they could be on to a winner.

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chrisrosa
16 hours ago
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Curiosity piqued!
San Francisco, CA
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Common Windows Malware Can Now Infect Macs

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A common form of malware on Windows systems has been modified into a new strain called "XLoader" that can also target macOS (via Bleeping Computer).


Derived from the Formbook info-stealer for Windows, XLoader is a form of cross-platform malware advertised as a botnet with no dependencies. It is used to steal login credentials, capture screenshots, log keystrokes, and execute malicious files. The malware was discovered by security researchers at Check Point Software.

A server hosting the macOS version of XLoader is available to bad actors on the dark web for $49 per month. Check Point tracked XLoader for a six-month period, seeing requests from 69 countries, indicating significant use across the world. More than half of all victims were based in the United States.

Formbook continues to be a prevalent threat, being part of over 1,000 malware campaigns in the last three years, and XLoader is expected to have even wider use given its cross-platform capability and greater level of sophistication.

Head of Cyber Research at Check Point, Yaniv Balmas, said that macOS's growing popularity has exposed it to increasing attention from cybercriminals, who see the platform as a worthwhile target.
While there might be a gap between Windows and macOS malware, the gap is slowly closing over time. The truth is that macOS malware is becoming bigger and more dangerous.
According to Check Point, XLoader is stealthy enough for it to remain hidden to most users. It is possible to check for its presence by using macOS's Autorun to check the username in the OS and look into the LaunchAgents folder, where entries with suspicious filenames should be deleted.
Tag: malware

This article, "Common Windows Malware Can Now Infect Macs" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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chrisrosa
7 days ago
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"macOS's Autorun" - ummm...what?
San Francisco, CA
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Sidiocrate Organizer Bins

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Sidiocrate Organizer Bins

 | Buy

Milk crates are great for storing stuff, but they’re too wide open for organizing smaller items. SIDIO makes half-height milk crates with adjustable dividers. They can be equipped with a snap-on lid or interior mat to keep things from falling out. They also make heavy-duty metal dividers that attach to standard milk crates.

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chrisrosa
8 days ago
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OMG...these crates are following me around the web!! Help!!
San Francisco, CA
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Reaching people on the internet in 2021

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Reaching people on the internet in 2021

A comic about social networks.

View on my website

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chrisrosa
15 days ago
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I don't really do newsletters. How about RSS @Oatmeal?
San Francisco, CA
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App Tracking Transparency causing 15% to 20% revenue drop for advertisers

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Apple's App Tracking Transparency feature is causing a 15% to 20% drop in revenue for iOS advertisers, according to a mobile marketing executive.
Credit: AppleCredit: Apple
In an interview with GamesBeat, Consumer Acquisition's Brian Bowman says that Apple's change to Identifier for Advertisers (IDFA) tracking has had a devastating impact on iOS advertising revenue.

Read more...
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chrisrosa
15 days ago
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Nelson pointing... "Haaaah haah!!".
San Francisco, CA
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Easily navigate through the Admin console using the updated left-hand navigation bar

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Quick summary 

We’re introducing a streamlined, persistent navigation experience in the Admin console. The new left-hand navigation column allows you to quickly browse through and navigate to key pages without losing context or your place in the Admin console. You’ll also notice updated icons for each category, bringing the Admin console design inline with other Google products.



You can easily collapse the navigation bar by selecting the menu icon at the top right when you need more space on the page to complete tasks.

We hope the updated navigation experience, along with other recent upgrades, makes it faster for admins to navigate within the Admin console, allowing them to manage their users, domains, and policies with ease.

Getting started

  • Admins: This feature will be available by default. 
  • End users: There is no end user impact.

Rollout pace


Availability

  • Available to all Google Workspace customers, as well as G Suite Basic and Business customers

Resources


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chrisrosa
15 days ago
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Baby steps. 😂
San Francisco, CA
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