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Graphic Designer Envisions Apple Music With Simpler UI, Music History Stats, Group Playlists, and More

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Graphic designer Álvaro Pabesio shared his vision for an updated, enhanced Apple Music on Behance earlier today, and it's an impressively detailed look at UI tweaks and changes that Apple could make to fix a few user gripes with its streaming music app. As you look at Pabesio's designs, remember that this is a concept and in no way indicates or confirms what we'll see with Apple Music in iOS 12 later this year.

To start off, Pabesio revamped the Library tab, removing the vertical list for Playlists, Artists, Albums, and Songs, and introducing a horizontal tab bar that you can scroll through. With more space afforded from this change, new daily suggestions pop up right in Library for playlists, stations, artists, and personal mixes the app thinks you'll like.


Pabesio nixed "For You" completely by introducing features from this tab into other parts of the app, so the second tab is now Browse. Here you can perform the usual artist and album searches, and find the latest songs and new releases, but Pabesio added in a few details to truly expand browsing on Apple Music.

More information is now displayed on the screen at once, thanks to the reduction of the current app's large image banner carousel and the same horizontal scrolling bar from Pabesio's Library tab. Pabesio highlights a much smaller new album/song carousel at the top of his concept, "Trending now" tracks, and places your personal mixes on this page as well.


In the graphic designer's imagining of Apple Music, you can provide even more granular feedback into mood playlists by filling out a prompt, like "I'm [happy] and feeling like [going out]." Pabesio's description says depending on your response Apple Music will take into account the music in your Library, the mood you chose, and find "up to 5 hours of selected music" for you to listen to.

One of Pabesio's biggest overhauls is a new "Social" tab, taking the rudimentary features Apple added in iOS 11 last September and greatly expanding upon them. When you open the tab you see a similar horizontal tab bar like the one found in Library, and it houses Stats, Friends, Rankings, and more. Apple Music can now show your plays broken down weekly, monthly, yearly, and all time, and even lets you know if you did above or below average in terms of music listening each week.


Each user's page now shows their song play counts, following and follower counts, and when you visit someone it'll provide a taste comparison graph, similar to music social network Last.fm. Underneath that, Apple Music profiles now show individually played songs, instead of just displaying the latest albums or playlists the user listened to.


These can still be seen too, however, with even more displayed on profiles like playlists, top artists, custom playlists, and more. For Apple's curated playlists, these also show follower counts, as well as up and down arrows to show when songs change position on charted playlists. All of these ideas extend to official artist pages as well.


Expanding even further on the social features is a new group playlist ability, so you can create public or private playlists with up to 50 friends. Pabesio also notes tiny fixes like "relevant notifications," a "revamped album view," and the return of double-tapping artwork to love a song.

Overall, Pabesio's Apple Music concept is an interesting look into ideas that Apple could incorporate into the Music app down the line, and there's much more to check out on his Behance page, including his tweaks to Apple Music on Mac. We should be hearing about any updates coming to Apple Music very soon, with the reveal of iOS 12 and much more at WWDC just two weeks away.


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chrisrosa
3 days ago
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some good stuff in here. like the compatibility metric a la last.fm. #applemusic
San Francisco, CA
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Gorillaz musician admits to leaving master copy of new album in London taxi

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Leaving an umbrella in a taxi? Forgivable. Wallet? You’ll eventually get over it. New Gorillaz album? You’ve got to be kidding me. This month it was reported that Damon Albarn, ... Read more

The post Gorillaz musician admits to leaving master copy of new album in London taxi appeared first on Lost At E Minor: For creative people.

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chrisrosa
4 days ago
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#321backup would have really helped in this case. Also, I hope that laptop was encrypted.
San Francisco, CA
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climate change project is raising funds to sculpt trumps face into arctic iceberg

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the 115-foot tall ice sculpture dubbed project trumpmore aims to demonstrate that climate change is happening.

The post climate change project is raising funds to sculpt trumps face into arctic iceberg appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

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chrisrosa
22 days ago
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perfect
San Francisco, CA
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This Stunning Image Made With Pure Code Is Like a Mood Ring For Your Browser

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Diana Smith makes web images unlike any you’ve probably seen before. That’s because when you’re looking at one of the user interface designer’s creations, you’re not looking at flat pixel data fetched from a server—you’re looking at pure code, rendered live before your very eyes.

Smith’s “Pure CSS Francine,” an elaborate code-drawing in the style of an 1800s oil painting, caused web developers on Twitter to have a meltdown this week. The work was not drawn with a tablet, or a mouse, or even using illustration software. Instead, Smith coded every element by hand in HTML and CSS, computer languages that tell your browser how to display web pages. This means that there is no “image” to save as a file when you view Pure CSS Francine on the web, but you can screenshot it or download the code and play around with it yourself.

This is a screenshot so it will look the same in your browser every time.

This makes Pure CSS Francine, and Smith’s other CSS images—like this awesome midcentury-style ad—a really unique piece of art. Because it’s made of code that’s telling a browser to do something, Francine can look very different when viewed in different browsers. When rendered in Netscape Navigator, for example, Francine morphs into a cubist masterpiece.

In an old version of Opera… Well, I don’t really know enough about art to say what it looks like really but it is definitely interesting.

“These browsers that were made back in the day, they didn’t anticipate that people would be making CSS art—it was just the internet where information lives and all you need is some rectangles and maybe some colour,” Smith explained. “When you look at this image on different browsers, you’re kind of looking at the history of the internet and what was demanded of it at the time.”

“It’s like a mood ring,” she said of Pure CSS Francine’s shapeshifting nature.

Cascading style sheets (CSS) give your browser instructions on how to display a given web page, and it turns out that you can do some pretty incredible stuff if you’re as talented and dedicated as Smith. Creating images with CSS involves writing code that will display an object in a browser and then manipulate its size, edges (to create a circle), colour, and so on. Much like how vector illustration involves manipulating shapes and putting them together to create a final design, CSS image creation involves layering and arranging shapes. The big difference is that with CSS, you can’t always see what you’re making while you’re making it, and so it’s a bit of a process of trial-and-error, Smith said.

“I have to type out each element first, and then write a rule for each of those elements—it’s not as easy or quick as loading up the thing on the paintbrush,” Smith said. “Sometimes that prevents me from making something quite as detailed as I’d like, just because it takes extra time.”

"There’s no good reason other than fun, just because, and art"

There’s no paintbrush, no cursor, no easy inputs besides a keyboard. It’s like a video game’s ultra-hard “survival mode” but for digital art. “I’m not even really sure why I’m that way,” Smith said, explaining that a good challenge is what inspires her.

Smith said that it takes her roughly two weeks to create a pure CSS image, although her work is never really done since the code that makes up the image can be tweaked endlessly. It’s worth noting that there are plenty of CSS images out there, but what makes Smith’s work stand out is its attention to aesthetics and visual appeal.

“I’ve heard that question a lot since I did this—like, why? There’s no good reason other than fun, just because, and art,” Smith told me, adding that she has no advantage over anyone else except for free time.

“A lot of people will tell you, if you’re trying to learn coding, find a free API and build a project out of it,” she continued. “It should be the same with CSS, because at that point you’re not doing anything for an employer, you’re just messing around with code, having fun with the process, and trying to challenge yourself. And this is a way of doing that.”

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chrisrosa
22 days ago
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sure. why not.
San Francisco, CA
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LC4: Another Pen-and-Paper Cipher

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Interesting symmetric cipher: LC4:

Abstract: ElsieFour (LC4) is a low-tech cipher that can be computed by hand; but unlike many historical ciphers, LC4 is designed to be hard to break. LC4 is intended for encrypted communication between humans only, and therefore it encrypts and decrypts plaintexts and ciphertexts consisting only of the English letters A through Z plus a few other characters. LC4 uses a nonce in addition to the secret key, and requires that different messages use unique nonces. LC4 performs authenticated encryption, and optional header data can be included in the authentication. This paper defines the LC4 encryption and decryption algorithms, analyzes LC4's security, and describes a simple appliance for computing LC4 by hand.

Almost two decades ago I designed Solitaire, a pen-and-paper cipher that uses a deck of playing cards to store the cipher's state. This algorithm uses specialized tiles. This gives the cipher designer more options, but it can be incriminating in a way that regular playing cards are not.

Still, I like seeing more designs like this.

Hacker News thread.

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chrisrosa
22 days ago
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San Francisco, CA
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Black Gun Owner Will Give Birth in Prison After Trying to Protect 2-Year-Old Daughter from Assailant

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RaSiwatu-Salama Ra is a 26-year-old black mother who watched in horror as an angry assailant—a neighbor with whom Ra had a dispute—deliberately crashed her vehicle into Ra's car while Ra's two-year-old daughter was playing inside. Ra removed her unloaded, legally purchased handgun from the glove box and brandished it, scaring the neighbor off.

The assailant, Channel Harvey, was never charged. Ra was arrested for felonious assault. She is now serving a mandatory two-year-sentence, even though Michigan is a Stand Your Ground state and Ra was clearly defending her family on her own property.

Ra is pregnant, and she is expected to give birth in prison.

The Detroit Metro Times, The Root, and Democracy Now! have all reported on the overwhelming criminal justice failures on display here. The jury in Ra's trial evidently ended deliberations early in order to wrap the case up before a major snowstorm hit—and that's not even the craziest thing about this case. The Detroit Police Department apparently treated Harvey as the victim, even though she rammed Ra's car, for the sole reason that Harvey beat Ra to the station and filed a police report first.

According to Ra's attorney, Victoria Burton-Harris, Ra and Harvey's nieces attended school together. These two girls had a disagreement; Ra contends that Harvey's niece beat up Ra's niece at school. On that basis, Ra decided that Harvey's niece wasn't welcome at the Ra household anymore. Harvey brought her over anyway. As Burton-Harris told Democracy Now!:

Siwatu called her sister herself and found out from her sister that there was no permission given for this young lady to be at the family home that day visiting, and therefore Siwatu informed the young lady that she needed to call her mother to come back and pick her up....

And so, the mother arrived about 10 minutes later to pick the child up. She was very upset, irate even. She pulled back up to Siwatu's family's home. She started yelling, using profanity. She was very angry. She started demanding answers. "Why can't my child be here? These girls have made up. Your niece has come to my home over the last two weeks. I don't understand." And she testified at trial that she thought she had a right to be on that property and to demand answers as to why her child was not welcome there. And that's where this incident started.

Harvey refused to leave, according to Burton-Harris, and eventually drove her car into Ra's, which was parked on the street with Ra's two-year-old daughter inside it.

At this point, Ra feared for her child's safety—and also the safety of her own mother, who was on the front porch. Harvey continued to move her car forward and backward in an aggressive manner. Finally, Ra retrieved her handgun and brandished it at Harvey. Harvey then used her cell phone to take a picture of Ra holding the gun and raced off to the police station, where she filed a police report.

Ra also filed a report, but Detroit police consider the first person to file a report to be the victim in a dispute. The Detroit Police Department has not responded to Reason's request for comment, but according to the Detroit Metro Times, multiple police detectives confirmed that this policy exists, including at the trial.

Again, Michigan residents enjoy the legal right to use a firearm to defend themselves and their property. But since Harvey complained first, investigators didn't give proper weight to Ra's side of the story. Bafflingly, the authorities decided that Ra wasn't engaged in self-defense at all but was instead engaged in the commission of a crime. She was charged with two counts of felony assault: one against Harvey, and one against Harvey's daughter, who was in Harvey's car.

Ra was arguably denied the right to a fair trial as well:

The jury was told the trial would likely only last two days, but it didn't begin deliberations until midway through Thursday—the fourth day. The forecast called for a blizzard on Friday, and the judge told the jury that it would return to court regardless of the weather if it didn't arrive at a decision. (It's worth noting that the court did close on Friday.)

Burton-Harris adds that the jury wasn't aware that Ra would receive a two-year prison sentence were she found guilty of any of the felony firearm charges because juries aren't informed of mandatory sentences.

When the jury began deliberations with the snowstorm looming, it could be heard hotly debating the case from the jury room, Burton-Harris says. Still, it quickly came to a decision—guilty on one charge of felonious assault against Harvey, acquittal on a second felonious assault charge against Harvey's daughter, and guilty on the felony firearm possession charge.

This decision obviously makes no sense. How could a jury conclude that Ra's self-defense explanation was sufficient to dismiss the charge of assaulting Harvey's daughter, but insufficient to dismiss the charge of assaulting Harvey herself? A jury looking forward to a three-day weekend was apparently disinclined to consider this contradiction.

Michigan's mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines require a two-year sentence, which means that Ra will have to give birth in jail. Her attorneys asked the court to delay her sentence until after the pregnancy was over, but this request was denied.

The Sierra Club and Black Lives Matter have expressed serious concerns about how this case was handled. Given that it involves a legal gun owner protecting her family and her property, it would be nice to see the National Rifle Association speak up as well. Ra doesn't belong in prison for any length of time, let alone the next two years of her young children's lives.

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chrisrosa
23 days ago
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What's going on #Michigan??
San Francisco, CA
freeAgent
23 days ago
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Los Angeles, CA
chrisrosa
23 days ago
sickening
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